New Tool! The Fox Folder

The Fox Folder is a miniature version of a larger bone folder that Gabrielle Butler gradually modified over for years to fit her working methods. Reducing the size for miniature books proved challenging, since it had to function like the original while being comfortable to hold. 

This is a precision tool that can be used for all aspects of miniature binding. One end is rounded, and can be used for drawing down a line or getting into a tight area. The other is angled to get into corners both when building and covering miniature boxes. One side is straight and rounded for smoothing, the other thinner for detail work. The back is flatter, ideal for little turn-ins and board edges when covering. Although this description sounds complex, it becomes easily embodied in use.

Gabrielle Fox Butler is an internationally known bookbinder who specializes in miniature books. She has had a long interest in developing new tools and equipment for miniature bookbinding, including consulting on design with Frank Weisner for his presses and Jeff Peachey for this tool.

Delrin is an ideal material for the Fox Folder since it combines durability with a low coefficient of friction. This tool is a great way to improve the accuracy and quality of your miniature bindings. Supplied in a protective storage tube.  The Fox Folder. The price is for one folder, the images show both ends. 

Delrin. Approximately 3 x .5 x .15 inch. $75.00

Purchase Here

New Tool: Deluxe Delrin Lifter

The Deluxe Delrin Lifter.

Most lifting tools are quite thin. Usually, this is great. But the thinness of the lifter results in a lack of control at the tip. In order to counteract this, I’ve come up with a very long wedge shape lifter that provides an an incredible amount of control for lifting, twisting, sliding, and prying. The straight cutting edge and rounded corners also aids precision manipulation.

This Deluxe Delrin lifter is designed for the lifting covering materials, backing removal, hinge removal, and tape removal. The cutting edge is flexible and so thin that the white delrin becomes translucent, a feature that could be useful in certain treatments. Delrin has a very low coefficient of friction, close to Teflon. The handle is hand carved out of a bar of Delrin .75 inch thick and an inch wide. The length gradually tapers, and the weight gives this precision tool a solid heft and a tremendous amount of control.

A must for paper, book, photographic, and other conservators and restorers. The length varies between 8 – 10 inches, since it is difficult for me to get a sharp, translucent, and flexible edge. They tend to get shorter and shorter as I work on them! If the overall length is critical to you, send me a note and I will let you know what is in stock.

Between 8 — 10 x 1 x .75 (thickness at the handle) inches. Tapered gradually along the length. The cutting edge is straight with rounded edges, to facilitate twisting and prying. A basic kit for maintaining the edge with instructions is included.

The Deluxe Delrin Lifter $95.00

The Deluxe Delrin Lifter.

To a Bookbinder. A Nineteenth Century Valentine

Everybody’s Valentine Writer. New Castle on Tyne: Printed and Published by R. Walker, ca. 1850 https://www.pbs.org/newshour/arts/before-the-valentine-card

To a Bookbinder:

Of all the great knaves, and of all the great fools

That ever yet handled a bookbinder’s tools;

Of all the big boobies that ere met my view–

Thou lank-haired and crooked-backed ninny, ’tis thou

Oh, well may the maidens all giggle and laugh.

To see such a carcase well bound up in calf,

Oh! Believe me, for ever and ever you’ll whine, 

Ere you press to pour chops a gay young Valentine.

Everybody’s Valentine Writer was a nineteenth century self-help book of sorts, to assist smitten romantics overcome stressful Valentine’s Day writer’s block. Some of the messages were quite targeted, even tailored to those in specific trades like bookbinding. There is another mid-nineteenth century valentine about a bookbinder with a wild image that I wrote about a few years ago. Both of these “vinegar valentines” share a common theme: bookbinders are undesirable foolish losers. Happy Valentine’s day, my dearest bookbinder colleagues!

Thanks to John Townsend for sending me to this Valentine!