Online Workshop: Making Delrin and Bamboo Tools. November 14 and 21.

Nine different basic tools we will make in the workshop. Of course, everyone is encouraged to redesign them for their own needs.

NOTE: The workshop is now full. If you would like to be on a waiting list, and also notified first of the next time I run this (likely spring 2021) please contact me. 

Making tools is not only engaging and fun, but entirely practical since the result is set of tools you can use daily. Bookbinders, book conservators, photographic conservators, paper conservators, and others will find this workshop valuable. Filing, scraping and polishing are meditative activities, no previous experience required. Working Delrin and bamboo is a great way to start toolmaking and we will make folders, lifting tools, microspatulas, hera, and creasing tools. Fair warning: making your own tools is highly addictive!

All aspects of making tools with delrin and bamboo will be discussed in detail: design considerations, cutting, filing, rough shaping, final shaping, and polishing. The workshop consists of two 3- hour synchronous zoom sessions with PPT’s, videos, discussion of handouts, demonstrations, Q&A chat sessions, and working together time. Also included is one month access to four videos demonstrating key techniques.

The workshop includes a kit with enough materials to make nine tools with a retail value over $300. Hand tools are also included: a cherry bench hook, scraper, burnisher, a file for plastics, and a variety of sanding and polishing supplies. All you need is a stable work surface, and some time to work between the two weekend sessions.

SCHEDULE: Two 3-hour sessions. Saturday November 14 and 21. 12-3pm Pacific, 1-4pm Mountain, 2-5pm Central, 3-6pm Eastern, 8-11pm GMT, 9-12 CET, 10 – 1am EET, 5am – 8am (+ 1 day) JST, 6am – 9am ( +1 day) UTC

International participants need to contact me for an invoice to pay by credit card, and order before October 17 to ensure kit arrival.

US participants can register here

COST: $375 US  ($425 Canada/  $445 other countries, includes shipping)

A Very Cool Patent Model Press

Patent Model Press. Source: https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_998708

One of the best ideas for a standing press I’ve seen. The adjustable bottom platen solves a lot of problems for modern binders and conservators, that often are working on only one book at a time. It would alleviate the need to add heavy wood packing materials, and the lower platen could be positioned at a comfortable work height.

According to the patent description, “This patent model demonstrates an invention for a bookbinders standing press which was granted patent number 30243. The press has a platen, or upper follower, lowered in the usual way by an iron screw, and a bed, or lower follower, that was raised by a rack and pinion.” Patent date 2 October 1860, Pelletreau, Maltby K.

The ratchet would allow for tremendous pressure with short swings of the press pin, and were not uncommon for heavy duty presses in the 19th century.

Were any ever made? If so, I want one!

There are around 400 printing and binding patent models in the Smithsonian’s Graphic Arts Collection.

 

 

The Most Important Tool for Most Crafts

A couple of months ago, I asked a number of colleagues what they considered the five most essential bookbinding tools. But nobody — myself included — mentioned what I now think the most essential tool for any craft is.  Ok, it may not *technically* be a tool, but it is fundamental to most crafts.

Many animals use tools like this, for example the chipmunk that used the wood stairs below to break open an acorn. The tool or piece of equipment?  A workbench.

A chipmunk used these wood stairs as a workbench to crack an acorn.

Workbenches are important to book conservators, both practically and conceptually.  A wobbly or insubstantial bench makes the most common activities much more difficult. The term serves as a shorthand for how one was trained: bench trained, apprentice trained, program trained. Every book conservation lab I’ve seen has a dedicated bench space for all full time technicians and conservators. Bench time is often specified as a percentage of work time distinct from other duties in job descriptions, though I’m always interested to hear from colleagues how accurate this turns out to be!

Why are workbenches are called benches. Aren’t they really worktables?

It turns out not to be a big mystery. Scott Landis, in his wonderful out-of-print book The Workbench Book, traces the workbench to an Egyptian carpenter’s bench from  ca. 1475 B.C.E. And guess what, early workbenches look very much like a modern bench, not a table.

Roman workbench from Scott Landis, The Workbench Book, Taunton Press, 1987, p. 8.

Landis describes a Roman bench ca. 250 B.C.E. that looks pretty much the same: a solid wood surface (about 2.75 x 14.5 x 102 inches, four splayed wooden legs, mortised into the top. Both appear roughly  knee height. In other words, a bench.

Very similar workbenches continue until the 18th century for many trades, with subtle variations. Woodworking benches often had mortices for bench dogs or vices attached.

Bookbinders are often portrayed working at one of the three fundamental tools of the trade: a lying or cutting press, a sewing frame, or a standing press. In the second quarter of the 19th century, the shift to case binding as the predominate structure likely created a need for a more table like work surface.  Many trades have different names for similar tools. For example, what most trades call a “tommy bar” bookbinders call a “press pin”. But the term workbench may have been borrowed from other trades.

Match That Workbench Contest 4
Workbench from Diderot. Do you know what trade? Source: https://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/201

Joel Moskowitz of Tools for Working Wood had a fun quiz on his blog a couple of years ago, trying to match seven workbenches found in Diderot to the trade associated with them.  Although the prize is long gone, it is still quite fun to imagine  how each bench may was used. And as he mentions, no cheating by looking it up!