Three Holiday Gift Ideas for Bookbinders under $50!

Last chance to order inexpensive bookbinding and conservation tools for the Holidays! Please note orders received after midnight Friday December 20 will ship January 6, 2020.

Genuine Horsebutt Strop

All strops wear out over time, often because a misplaced knife has dug a small hole in it.  Start of 2020 with a nice clean horsebutt strop!   Buy your new genuine horsebutt strop for only $25.

 

.9mm Microknife

This was my best selling item at the Guild of Book Workers Conference a few months ago, and is new for this year. Perfect for intricate cuts in tissue and paper. Paper conservators love it for infills. Artists love it to make stencils. And everyone loves the cleaver design that retracts completely into the standard supplied .9mm mechanical pencil handle.  Order your micro knife for only $35!

 

Delrin Hera

A delrin hera rapidly becomes indispensable for many bookbinding and conservation tasks.  I use it to gently turn leaves of fragile books, delaminate hinges of matted artwork, hold leaves down during photography, insert adhesive into bent book corners, score tissue for dry tearing, and to pry apart covering material when rebacking. But you won’t pry this beauty out of my hand. Get your own delrin hera for only $45!

New and Used Tools for Sale at the Guild of Book Workers Standards Conference, Philadelphia, October 24 – 26

New Merch! Peachey embroidered logo apron.

It has been quite a while since I vended at the Guild of Book Workers Standards of Excellence, so I decided to pull out all the stops this year and start to sell off some of the used tools and books I’ve collected over the years. Of course, all the new tools I make will also be available to inspect, test drive, and purchase.

I have a big bag of free horse butt scraps, no purchase necessary. Perfect to make small strops and blade covers.

You don’t have to be registered for the conference to attend. The Lowes Philadelphia Hotel is the venue in downtown Philadelphia, and vendor hours are Thursday October 24, 10 – 6, Friday 8 – 8, and Saturday 8 – 3:30.

I’m bringing around 75 books about books to sell, including these.

I’m also bringing a huge bargain box, filled with used bookbinding related tools: Starrett dividers, weights, knives, some prototypes of tools I currently make, a few older versions of tools — kind of a garage sale, really! All super discounted.

Even if you don’t want to buy anything, please stop by to say hi! It is always fun for me to meet those who read this blog.

A peek at the Bargain Box. First come, first serve!

Proportional Dividers. A Very Useful Tool.

A mid 20th century Alvin 450, a triangle and engineers square, and some one sixth scale miniatures.

Proportional dividers are ancient tools, dating back to Roman era, though as late as 1955 some thought they were a Renaissance invention.  The Alvin 450 is really handy when making miniatures, like the triangle and engineer’s square above, that I made for Fritz Otto Buchbinder.  They allow you to quickly see and measure what a reduction in the actual reduction size would be.  Using one is a much more intuitive than having to divide 100ths of an inch into something. But don’t get me started on numeric measuring!

 

Instructions for how to use a proportional dividers. http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/draftingsteals-store/proportional-divider-use.pdf

Other uses are to convert a given length of line into equal parts, divide a circle into equal parts, and even generate angles. All of which are useful for bookbinders. The 450 can generate proportions down to 10:1 for lines, and 20 :1 for circles. A regular dividers can do these things, but it takes some set up time.

They make a great addition to my  dividers collection.  I found them at a flea market, still in a fake leather covered wooden box, with a nifty sliding pin latch, all for $10. They originally sold for $9.75, so they have held their value. New ones are still available, though considerably more costly, having a list price of $216, though commonly found for $132.

Obviously, though, one can never have too many tools. I’m still looking for a used 458 (10 inches long) and a 950 (stainless steel)….