Short Pencils

This pencil box, filled with well worn pencils, strikes me as extremely poignant.  Someone treasured, or at least saved these used up pencils and eventually they were resold to in a junk shop.  It is increasingly rare to even see well worn objects– things just break or get discarded because they are obsolete or out of fashion.  No one today (except Jim Croft!) would ever consider using a pencil that is so short, awkwardly grasping it at the end of two fingers and a thumb, then slowly writing.  I imagine when the ferrule prevented the pencils from entering any further into the pencil sharpener, someone removed it and tried to sharpen them from the other end.  Using the ferrule to make the double ended pencil seems an absurd amount of work for very little benefit.  But since many of the pencils appear not to have been used after being sharpened, were these made as an exercise to pass the time? Could the person who made this not be able to afford a new pencil, or just being creative?  Even the pencil box, well constructed with finger joints and a sliding lid, is a rarity these days.  The remains of these pencils are possibly more interesting than the words or numbers that they once wrote– pointing to the value and importance of tools.

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For those old enough remember card catalogs and the little pencils (aka. golf pencils) scattered around them, this informative documentary explores where they come from, how they were made and how they were used.  Documentaries like this one give us a fascinating glimpse into how earlier cultures lived, worked,  and constructed the objects of daily life.

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The new Zebra mechanical pencils, available from Staples and Amazon, costing 39 cents each are close to ideal. They are light, cheap and cleverly designed. The lead that comes with the pencil is fairly poor quality, but is easily replaced. Pressing the eraser advances the lead. But  their best feature is their perfect overall length– most pencils are too long, at least for my hand, and have been that way for the past 100 years or more.


a new bone?

dyed bone

The Library Preservation blog mentioned a very cool Martha Stewert branded bone folder, made from melamine.  I also picked up a nifty new bone from a flea market, but haven’t been able to identify the material it is made from. The coloring appears to penetrate the thickness. It has the density, rigidity and pore structure of bone.  But the mottled appearance and seams on the edges could indicate tortoise shell which has been laminated.  Or it might be some kind of horn.

Occam’s Bottle Opener

Simplex Sigulllim Veritas.  I bought this in Nepal in 2002. It functions beautifully, is made from the simplest of materials and costs virtually nothing to manufacture.  A bolt, two nuts and a scrap piece of wood.  But the man I purchased this from specialized in making or reselling these- he had hundreds, and it was a very common item in restaurants.  To use it, it is turned upside down and the the bottle cap inserted at the end,then the head of the bolt lifts the bottom it off. I think I paid about 5 cents for it and it even comes with a hang hole.